Drug Facts Anchor: back

 

Buprenorphine - Suboxone - Subutex

Cocaine

Heroin

Marijuana

Methamphetamine

Effects of Drugs on the Brain

Anchor: buprenorphine

 

Buprenorphine - Suboxone - Subutex

Buprenorphine became legal for use, under the care of a certified physician, in the United States, in 2002. The drug is often used as a detoxification agent for opiate addicts and also as a long term treatment for stabilizing recovery from opiate use.

Buprenorphine is very strong at certain opiate receptor sites in the brain and will actually push other opiates like heroin, painkillers, or methadone off of the neuron. At other opiate receptor sites, Buprenorphine acts as an antagonist, blocking opiate activity. These two features make it particularly effective in detoxification.

If an addict is taking opiates of any sort and they start taking Buprenorphine, they can experience violent and rapid withdrawal. If the dosage of Buprenorphine is improper, there may not be enough buprenorphine left to re-occupy the opiate receptor sites. This is called precipitated withdrawal. If an addict is already in mild withdrawal, many of the brain receptor sites are empty so most of the buprenorphine can be used for occupying them with little wasted on expelling other opiates. This tends to create a situation where, without the mood inducing effect of opiates, detox can be managed with a gradual taper of Buprenorphine.

Buprenorphine is available in two commercial forms. Subutex is a patent drug form of Buprenorphine alone. Suboxone is a patent drug consisting of a combination of Bruprenorphine and the opiate blocker Naloxone. This combination was formulated to reduce the abuse potential of Buprenorphine. Suboxone is taken sublingually (under the tongue). If the pill is crushed and injected, or swallowed in large doses by a potential abuser, the Naloxone will block opioid receptors in the brain and create withdrawal.

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Anchor: cocaine

 

Cocaine

Cocaine addiction is a significant brain event. This addiction is characterized by extreme cravings associated with dopamine depletion which then leads to the drive to access more cocaine to recreate the effects of the missing dopamine.  The effects of cocaine ingestion - whether by inhalation, smoking or injection - are more  immediate when compared to most other drugs. This causes  the addict to quickly associate the use of cocaine with the immediate reward. Once this thought process is established, the road to more severe consequences rises quickly and the addiction becomes an overwhelming drive that requires attention to stop so that strong recovery can be achieved.

At the Addiction Recovery Center of Temecula, all levels of addiction treatment that we offer are closely coordinated for each client by our staff of licensed psychologists and our Internationally Certified Alcohol/Drug Counselor (ICADC), registered Substance Abuse Professional (SAP), Certified Alcohol/Drug Counselor - highest level (CADC II), and Intervention Specialist. This serves to ensure that the treatment is based on the most information and up-to-date therapies that can be provided to address the specific mental, biological and emotional issues of each client and his/her family.

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 Anchor: heroin

Heroin

Heroin addiction is the result of the addict's brain responding to the decrease of endorphin as a direct result of heroin use. Being that heroin mimics endorphin, the brain becomes dependent upon the administration of heroin to function at a perceived "normal" level. It is for this reason that the heroin addict needs to regularly use heroin in order to feel "well". The drive increases with time and the person becomes unable to consider life without heroin.

Detoxing from heroin is not - in itself - life threatening but can be extremely painful. The nervous system is on "high alert" during the detoxification process and the addict experiences hyper-sensitivity to any sensation.

At the Addiction Recovery Center of Temecula, our staff of licensed psychologists and our Internationally Certified Alcoohol/Drug Counselor (ICADC) who also is a registered Substance Abuse Professional (SAP), Certified Alcohol/Drug Counselor - highest level (CADC II) and Intervention Specialist, work together to coordinate and provide specific care for each of our clients. This treatment will encompass all those areas that require healing. Whatever the treatment level chosen, we are dedicated to offering the most comprehensive, up-to-date addiction treatment program to adequately assist those suffering from the consequences of substance abuse on the journey to recovery.

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 Anchor: marijuana

Marijuana

Marijuana is a substance that has been around for centuries. It has been used ceremonially and for industrial use. However, as time has progressed, the market for illicit use has grown exponentially and the strength of the chemicals that create the high has increased dramatically.

Like other addictions, the hallmark of marijuana addiction is the uncontrollable obsession with the procurement of and use of the substance. Inevitably, negative consequences result and marijuana becomes a deterrent to healthy interactions and lifestyle choices.

The cycle of addiction is considerably quicker due to the increased potency of the THC chemical in marijuana. As tolerance builds, the abuser develops stronger cravings and finds that more marijuana is needed to achieve the same high.

Memory-related problems surface, promoting a decrease in performance at school and work. High absenteeism often follows as motivation subsides which often leads to increased isolation from friends and family. Anxiety and depression are also commonly manifested.

As with other addictions, it is very common for any one - or a combination of - consequences to surface from marijuana addiction that include legal, financial or work troubles that then bleed over to negatively effect the family.

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Anchor: methamphetamine

 

Methamphetamine

Methamphetamine addiction can be more quickly devastating than most any other addiction. Because methamphetamine affects the dopamine systems in the brain, most notably the circuits tied to reward and arousal, damage is done to neurons in the brain that are associated with creating arousal and pleasure. As a result, the addict experiences the use of methamphetamine as an intensely rewarding event and he/she becomes driven to focus on attempting to make the feeling of reward repeat over and over. This addictive behavior gives the addict a perceived escape from anxiety, fear, and stress.

Any attempt to stop the use of methamphetamine without fully addressing the biological and social causes and consequences in a directed and professional setting will more likely than not lead the addict to experience anxiety, fear, or stress. This then provides the addict fertile ground to attempt to relieve these symptoms with more methamphetamine use.

As with any addiction, successful treatment for methamphetamine addiction can be accessed best through a strong, specifically designed recovery program that looks at all of the dynamics of the addiction and provides the care and support for each individual to find his/her way to sobriety.

At the Addiction Recovery Center of Temecula, our staff coordinates client care to provide treatment that addresses the specifics of methamphetamine addiction on both the addict and those around them. Each of our programs are designed to incorporate strong, up-to-date information, education and individual care to lay the strongest foundation upon which recovery can be built.

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